And now. . . a Word from our Sponsor

Oh, the big red letters stand for the Jell-O family;
Oh, the big red letters stand for the Jell-O family;
That’s Jell-O!
Yum-yum-yum!

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Jell-O: A Biography makes it clear that Jell-O was intended to be a dessert. But after Mrs. John Cooke’s Perfection Salad (also mentioned in Jell-O’s biography), it became a frequent addition to salads in the 1930s. Lemon rose from the fourth most popular flavor to second — specifically for its use in salads. And then they added the icky LIME flavor just to please the aspic fans. 1943 saw a cola-flavored Jello-O. By 1964, we get celery, mixed vegetable, seasoned tomato, and Italian salad flavors. They drop those by the time I was born.

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What was a “Savior to the Servantless” in WW1 was simple, cheap, and fancy in the Depression. It sold for 3 boxes for a quarter. Perfection Salad was often featured (“a delicious vitamin-rich salad for a few pennies a serving!”) and a Jell-O Cheese Loaf. The Crown Jewel Jell-O recipe makes it into all the history books. But overall, the most popular Jell-O recipe in the 30s was “Under-the-Sea Salad,” in the 40s was “Lemon Chiffon Pie” (great for war rationing since it required no lard or even eggs) and in the 50s was “Parfait Pie.”

All this from cow bones and pig skins.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SMsxBVDT34[/youtube]

One Response to “And now. . . a Word from our Sponsor”

  1. Lisa says:

    “By 1964, we get celery, mixed vegetable, seasoned tomato, and Italian salad flavors.”

    Is that for real? Eeewwwwwww!