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We Need to Step Up!

Physical molestation, sexual molestation, it will not be swept under the rug [at Bob Jones University]. It never has been. It’s not the way we operate. It’s always reported to the authorities.

Bob Jones III, 15 November 2011

Reading the transcript from Third’s sermon yesterday has been too much for me. We all know he’s not telling the truth–either ignorantly or deliberately. All of us. This is most easily proven because in the 2010 Clery Act Reportwhich colleges and universities who receive federal funds are required to file — Bob Jones University did not report Charles “Chipper” Snow’s sexual assault of a minor.

We all know this. It’s a simple fact. Plain and public. It just needs to be stated for the record.

Many people have flooded my inbox with stories that, if they were pursued in the full sunshine, would prove similar cover-ups. Third has thrown down the gauntlet. He’s challenging us to tell the truth. And we need to step up.

I’ll start.

Here’s one thing I know. One thing I was privy to. One thing I can say.

I was this student’s “Prayer Captain” — the WW2-era phrase that BJU uses to identify an older student who’s two-steps up in the disciplinary hierarchy. It’s not a paid position. All it meant was that I had been around a little bit longer and that I was pretty compliant with the BJU authority.

I’ll call this student, “Jennifer,” though that’s not her real name.

It was 22 years go this month. In 1989. Probably right around this time of year — before Thanksgiving and all. I was ironing, as we did so often in the 80s. And she had been acting needy for a few weeks. Just homesickness, I figured. She was up on my bunk — top of the double. It was a Thursday or Tuesday afternoon. Cold and icky outside like today. And she said, “My father has been sexually abusing me ever since I can remember.”

I had never, ever, ever, ever, ever had someone admit that to me. I was an English major. A student! I knew nothing about how to handle things like this. Nothing. And my first gut impulse was to say, “You must be mistaken.” I didn’t say that. Thankfully, the Holy Spirit muzzled me. What I did say was this: “I don’t know what to say. I don’t know! But I do know you need to talk to someone. . . . And I’ll get you the appointment. You tell me who you want to talk to.”

She picked Jim Berg, the Dean of Students. Okay. Seemed like a good plan to me. So I forged on.

And I got the run-around. That’s not all that terribly surprising. It is a big organization, and the secretarial gatekeepers have a job to do. I can handle that. So I pushed. And I pushed. And I got “Jennifer” an appointment with Jim Berg. She wanted me to come with her.

I sat in on those first two meetings. I believe she had one or two with him after that without me, but I’m not sure since I didn’t attend. And this was my face-to-face introduction to how sexual assault is handled in the Bob Jones University system. This is how pastors are taught to handle alleged crime in the IFB. So it didn’t happen to me; it happened in front of me.

His manner was very kind. It was. In those two initial meetings that I witnessed. He told her that it wasn’t her fault. I heard him say that. He told her that what her father did was clearly wrong. He made it clear that it was all her dad’s problem, and none of her own.

But other things were just . . . strange. Berg told her that she was still a virgin metaphysically, even if she weren’t one physically. Well, no, but . . . maybe that helps. He told her that when she did date a young man, she should not tell him about this because he might conclude that she was ‘damaged’ and would take liberties with her that had already been taken. Really, you want to lay that guilt on her? I thought you said it wasn’t her fault? Instead “Jennifer” should have Berg tell him if she so wished. He then went on to say that there was no reason she ever needed to tell her boyfriend/fiancé/husband about the events unless she needed to keep her own children away from their grandpa’s care. Maybe that’s good? I don’t know. . . . Maybe that would free her up–that idea that she never needed to tell. Maybe? But what about the crime against her? Her damage? Does that count? I’m not sure if those things helped or hurt. I’m not in her shoes. But I think it’s more of a burden to hide in the darkness than to step out in the light.

But then there’s the rest. Berg insisted that she never go to the police and he added vague threats of future rejection to her already-big-burden. “Going to the police breaks up families, and you wouldn’t want to carry that burden. Dads go to jail and families have no source of income. Moms blame their daughters and they get jealous of the sexual attention their daughters are receiving.”

Okay. . . . There’s a lot that’s wrong with his advice. But just one thing–notice how he framed that: she must never go to the police. What about him? What about Jim?

That was wrong. I thought it was right for years until in 2005 or so a friend explained mandatory reporting laws. As a counselor, an employee in an organization who cares for others, Jim Berg was required to file a police report. By law! So was his secretary, dorm counselors–anybody in BJU’s employ.

But there’s more. Her dad was the local IFB church’s Sunday School Superintendent. And “Jennifer” said explicitly that she was worried about her younger minor sisters who were still at home. “‘Susan’ [not her real name] is starting to get headaches now,” she said. “And I think my dad is doing it to her.”

That’s what makes me sob. There were minors at risk, and Jim Berg did nothing. It was a matter of BJU policy that he did nothing. Nothing. Nothing at all. Oh, instead he told “Jennifer” that if her dad tried something again over Christmas vacation to say, “NO!” And “I’ve told the authorities at BJU about this. They know.” And he gave her his phone number. . . . He doesn’t know much about sexual abuse victims, does he? Or power. Or even the law.

“Jennifer” or “Susan” might be reading this. “Susan” probably wouldn’t know that I know. But “Jennifer” does. “Jennifer” is a forty-something mommy. The statute of limitations is not up yet on her Dad’s crimes. She can still go to the police. And I would stand with her. Just like I tried so feebly to do back then. I’m sorry we had such bad counsel. I pray for you a lot, “Jennifer.” I do.

This is just one story I know first-hand. What do you know?

UPDATE — The Chipper Snow crime occurred .7 miles driving distance (.5 miles walking distance) from BJU’s campus. Therefore, it is in the “surrounds” (one mile radius) and BJU must report it under the Clery Law. Period.

We Need to Step Up!
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102 thoughts on “We Need to Step Up!

  • November 16, 2011 at 3:12 pm
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    My head hurts. My heart hurts. I just got the same advice to “just say no” to someone harassing me (I’m hesitant to say assaulting) from my Dad…and all I could think was, “You don’t understand. You don’t understand.”

    I wish there was more I could do. I feel so powerless to help others because I am so removed from BJU and only know those of us who have escaped through a nom de plume adopted to protect my family.

    Hugs and love to you, Camille. And prayers for you. And for everyone who has been so horrified by the actions and inactions of BJU.

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    • November 16, 2011 at 9:26 pm
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      Making accusations and not providing real names is easy. Anyone can do that. Even if what you said is true Mrs. Lewis, you still continued in school and was a faculty member for a long time (until you were considered redundant). Your hatred for BJU has blinded you. It has.

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      • November 16, 2011 at 9:38 pm
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        There we go. I wondered how long it would take.

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        • November 18, 2011 at 12:31 pm
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          Camille, you’re the one who takes the front line hits. I admire your self-controlled restraint. I don’t know how you do it. You never cease to amaze me.

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      • November 16, 2011 at 10:02 pm
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        Luke,

        Do you know that Law Enforcement doesn’t release names of rape or molestation victims?

        Neither do newspapers unless the newspaper has permission by the victim to do so.

        If Law Enforcement knows not to do such a thing, then what’s your point? It’s a matter of ethics and confidentiality. Clearly something that Berg and others at BJU know nothing of. (Have my own story to tell on that one.)

        Have to say, Luke, I have heard some knuckleheaded things today, but this comment of yours takes the cake.

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      • November 16, 2011 at 10:03 pm
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        My wife’s proper title is “Dr.” Lewis. She and I both have our earned doctorates.

        I can vouch that every word of what my wife has written above is true. I know the names of the people involved. I knew them then, and I know them now. There’s no fabrication going on. Whether you believe the facts as they’re related above does not change their veracity.

        It’s true: we continued at BJU for a long time, yes. We, like many people, were so tied to the institution we’d lost track of where we ended and they began. There’s a word for organizations that subjugate their constituents in this way.

        We were not fired. We were not considered redundant. Our choice to resign was because we were told that we could no longer share with students and colleagues the truths that God was teaching us. We later realized that what we were learning and sharing was reformed doctrine.

        Neither my wife or I hates anyone. What we hate is victimization, injustice, abuse, and theology that twists God into a petty deity who keeps track of good marks and bad marks like some kind of a mean-spirited, bean-counting taskmaster. We hate seeing people enslaved to a false image of God. We hate knowing that good people are enslaved to a system of Pharisaical rules and regulations. We hate knowing that we spent many, many years of our lives contributing to the institutional machinery that robbed people of the joy and freedom that Christ purchased for them.

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      • November 16, 2011 at 10:30 pm
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        Of course she wouldn’t have given the name out… my goodness.

        Bearing one another’s burdens is not easy… we’re called to it.

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      • November 17, 2011 at 12:31 am
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        Dear Luke,

        I’m interested in what you have to say. Please repost in English.

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        • November 18, 2011 at 1:17 pm
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          That’s easy. Luke meant to say “Shut up.” Original of him, yes? >.<

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      • November 18, 2011 at 12:27 pm
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        Luke, Exposing : the inconsistencies, the contradictions, the cover-ups, the hypocracies of institutional deceit is ‘not accusation’, it’s the airing of ‘dirty laundry’. Christian insitutions have no moral or legal right to presume ANY immunity from the responsibility to report immoral crimes against minors. Just because an institution’claims’ to be christian, does’nt give it a free-entitlement ‘pass card’ of ‘above reproach status’, ie, “no body can touch US, cause ‘wer’e’ the big BJU. Every school and college Institution in America is required by law to report sexual crimes against children and minors and college age students. And when they ‘don’t’, and they ‘lie’ about that fact, they ‘need to BE REMINDED!!! of that fact, which is exctly what this post is doing.’ BJU’s long standing arrogant practice, of ‘doing just about whatever they jolly well want to do’, because one of the high and mighty Bobs “SAID SO”,and administration ‘yes men’ piously agreeing with them’ to stay in their ‘Bob’s inner circle’,this long standing practice of ultra can’t touch us perfection, is the ‘very’ ugly thing that ‘needs’ to be pin pricked with the truth, like a needle lancing an infection filled with pus. Scratching the surface of insitutional rationalistic, cop-out escapism by having nice little chats about it, nice pious sounding ‘are’nt we so wonderful’ chapel sermons about how much they blindly believe they have been so morally responsible to keep close to the law about reporting these ugly things…., won’t ever ‘fix the sickness’ in places like BJU. And there is a big, big difference about ‘hating evil practices’ and the people damaged by such evil practices, than hating an actual place. Christians have a weak understanding of the difference between hating evil and hating people. That’s why so many of them, hate people, and practice evil. And then go and brag about how wonderful they think they are. If any person was blinded by hate, they would be controlled by that hate also. They would be unable to love or care about people at all. Camille is about as far from being blinded by hate as the man in the moon! Being angry at injustice, the blatant sin of lies and deceit, and hating the evil that is behind such injustce, is ‘not being blinded at all.’ It’s being provoked ‘to do something ‘morally responsible’ about something that should not be allowed to remain hidden. The enemy always works in darkness, he never wants things to be brought out into the light, he hates the light and he hates the truth. Which is why he uses dishonest people who also hate the truth and hate the light. We are talking about professing christians, here, Luke, professing christians who tell lies and then brag about how honest they think they are after, ‘even while’ they’re doing that. The enemy uses bad people like these to do the very things he wants them to do ‘keep things hidden.’ So Luke there is a big, big difference between accusation and exposing sinful lies and sinful practices. As long as you have any need to defend and protect places and systems like BJU you are probably going to find yourself really between a rock and hard place, not truly free to follow your own heart, conscience, and the Lord who loves you and calls you into the light, so that you can walk in the light with other people too. You will need to make a judgment Call some day about ‘who’ you really want to follow and ‘where’ you really want to go as a believer. Because as long as you follow the scandelous examples of deceitful people like the 3 Bobs and his religious mafia goons, and insititutions like BJU, your christian walk and conscience will be compromised so seriously that, the condition of your relationship with God, down the road, may be such that you may not even ‘have’ a genuine relationship with Him any longer. You cannot serve two masters. You will either hate the one or love the other. God wants to be glorified in your life luke. He can never be as long as you have a need to glorify BJU and keep that place and its leaders on an idolatrous false religious pedestal. I hope that some day God will reach your mind and heart, and call you out of the darkness of denial and blindness and into the light of truth, grace and ‘real love.’

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      • November 20, 2011 at 8:33 pm
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        Luke,
        I was raped by a BJU student. It is documented in BJU’s files and in two other locations. Are you going to also accuse me of lying just b/c I am not telling you my name? It was NOT reported to the police. The expectation was that I would keep quiet. The student went on to graduate. I see his diploma as a stamp of approval by the administration. Students who listen to contemporary christian music or go to movies can be expelled, yet a rapist is allowed to graduate…

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      • November 22, 2011 at 8:56 pm
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        @ Luke – I have no idea who you are or why you are making such a statement. I do NOT hate BJU, but I wish they would be truthful. The truth is that they DO cover up rapes. They do NOT report them to the police. Have you ever thought that the reason some don’t want to share our names is b/c we don’t want every detail of our deepest shame and humiliation paraded before the world? They did not report what happened to me, yet they humiliated me with all their detailed questions to record in their files. There wasn’t the slightest hint of compassion, only the obvious expectation that I was to keep silent about it, which I did. Years later, when the memories surface, I still can’t stop shaking. I still can’t keep from getting sick. I still can’t stop the nightmares – yet they get up and state that they always report rapes. I don’t even know what to do with this. I feel like they are spitting in my face! I have no defense unless I want the whole world to know my shame. Why would they do this? They could have just not said anything at all.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 3:27 pm
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    thank you for writing this. when i was at bja/u, i had an acad roommate – same age as me – and it was pretty well known that either her father or brother was sexually abusing her, and that is why she ended up at bja, living in the dorms. nothing was done – just some “counseling” with the dean of women – but she went home for the holidays, and her family visited her just like everything was peachy keen. this was around 92-93. i never said / did anything either, tho. i feel very guilty about this now. i really hope this girl was able to get the help she needed outside of the bj system.

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    • November 20, 2011 at 1:31 pm
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      I can relate to ‘bystander guilt’ and ‘survivor guilt.’ I know from experience and God’s Grace and love working in my life,that God can and does heal this kind of guilt which is actually ‘false guilt.’ We can receive His healing for this. We also need to ask God for the Grace that we may be empowered to ‘forgive ourselves.’ Really important. I was the unfortunate family member having terrible things done to me ‘that God never intended’ by a sibling whose creepy friends joined in. Small children can’t cope with the confused emotions and terrible fear associated with the shame. The father did’nt know what was going on. So was never told. I can’t remember but, I believe the sibling terrified me with a very scary threat of some kind. like ” If you tell dad, I’ll tell dad you are lying. And you know what God does to liars!” A little child who takes almost religiously, the ten commandments that she has learned in Sunday school, a threat like that from an older sronger sibling who is strong enough to really hurt you physicaly, can really be terrifying. My mother spoiled this sibling so much, the he was ‘her golden boy’ who could not possibly do anything wrong in her blinded emotional sight and thinking. He was a ‘little hellion’ and later a ‘big’ hellion and ‘holy terror.’ Children abused like this later as adolescents, have already been so negatively brainwashed and ‘mentally conditioned’ to keep quiet about it. So by the time they get to college, can you imagine how much courage it would take for them, to approach an authority figure they’re not even related to? And to then be given an ‘get past it’ message’,a ‘you have to forgive’ pound of flesh offering to God to ‘please Him’, you ‘have to take responsibility’ for what happened to you’ my God, can you imagine the shock, disappointment, and invalidation such a person would experience when it has probably taken them umpteen years, to even ‘talk about it’ to another person? I just can’t imagine the downcast devastation of a person, who would leave an office with their head in a spin, after finally trusting someone for the first time with this pain,wondering, ‘Why bother’ when ‘nobody really understand or cares anyway?’ The person’s childhood familes have their ‘family secrets.’ And sick Institutional families, like BJU USED TO… praise God….USED TO… have ‘their family secrets.’ Perhaps by God’s Grace,along with all the wonderful people who are standing along side good people like Camille, and other like minded dedicated people, and along with you guys, can ‘make a real differnce.’ And by exposing BJU’s ‘family secrets’, don’t back down until somebody with the authority really does something about it. No matter how much s—flies around, and people like us get accused of sinning and bitterness….., do not back down or give in. If you need to give in to somebody, give in to God! But don’t give in to these —–‘s at BJU! Don’t let BJU and other like minded mean spirited and false guilt monger deceitful insitututions get away with what they have been getting away with keeping hidden for too long. And they will continue to try to keep these ugly things hidden, deny them, lie about them, and play the hypocritical games of mr and mrs polly perfect goody goody two shoes, all that nauseating religious baloney, that we’re all so sick and tired of. Something that we can all do something about it. By doing what Camille is leading the ‘clean up troops’ in doing right now. So keep up the good fight. Sorry this was so long. I just had to say this. And, yes, I have forgiven everyone. and ,no, the sibling has never apologized one time. People who do these kinds of things, and the people who blindly defend them, are ‘always arrogant’. Arrogance and hypocracy about these kinds of sins, always seem to go together like the terrible twins of sin. The common letter in SIN, PRIDE and LIE, is the big EGO of ‘I’. I hope you, Itrain, can trust God to help you forgive yourself for not being able to help that person. God sees your heart. And HE’s not at all disappointed in you. He’s pleased with you. You have grown into a sincerely caring person. So He can trust you. I’m proud of your courage and honesty to share what you did. God Bless.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 3:32 pm
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    Wow. I remember Berg talking about a case like this in orientation (I remember it being in Stratton Hall) with similar details: the girl coming forward about it, the working on putting it in the past. The abused girl went out with a guy for artist series and he touched her knee which undid a whole lot of counseling. Berg explained that he had a meeting with the guy and basically wanted to deck the kid. I remember it being humorous when he shared that part about having paternal anger towards the guy on the girl’s behalf.

    It was in front of us the whole time.

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    • November 16, 2011 at 4:42 pm
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      I heard the same story. I also sat through this kind of counsel with a young victim. BJU, the Wilds, the not-affiliated-not-networked fundy tribe of evangelists and churches and ministries, all had the same line. Get over it! Don’t be bitter! If you are angry about being abused you are the sinner! As if perusing justice and stopping the abuser to continue abusing is an act of bitterness. Shame, BJU. You have been the fountain for this teaching and preaching coming out of those men’s mouths. Shame.

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      • November 20, 2011 at 1:50 pm
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        Rachel, I always say and insist that ‘not all anger’ is bad, a sin, or wrong! And believe me, not everyone likes to hear this. And you know what! I DON’T REALLY CARE. Not all anger is sin. PERIOD! But blind places and ignorant people like the don’t care about people BJU pharisees, they can’t tell the difference between one emotion and another, between right and wrong, between good and evil, between sin and grace. If God ever gave them a test on what the differences are between Judge and bless, or judgement and blessing, they would probably have a mental breakdown, if God really pressed them on the issue! But of course God ‘would’nt’ do that because He’s a God of Grace. And He never imposes His will upon the free will of anybody. They’re so confused that they mix everything up in ‘religion’ and then call ‘everything’they don’t like, want to hear, or disapprove of, SIN. So according to ‘them’ just about every damn thing is a sin. This is sin. That is sin. Everything is sin. Why the H bother getting up in the friggen morning, for crying out loud, if ‘everything’ is just another damn sin. And they tell people this lie that God is this mean cop in the sky ready to ‘get you’ for being IMPERFECT. PLEEEEEASE! SPARE MEEE. Rachel thanks for calling it what it really is, what BJU has been doing for a long time. Spewing out this ugly fountain of false preaching and false teaching for too long. Shame on them for spewing out shame on anybody who disagrees with them and tries to expose evil and injustices. All the false teachers at BJU and like minded shame based insitututions, need to be silenced. Did’nt God say through Moses to Pharoah: “Let my people go?” Let this be the prayer for true freedom of all people trapped in bad systems like IFB and BJU..LET MY PEOPLE GO! Thanks Rachel for telling it like it is.

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    • November 16, 2011 at 5:17 pm
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      I remember the story from orientation, too, with the added detail of the girl working in the Dining Common, starting to display a difference in her behavior, a staff member noticing, and the story coming out. It was even supposed to have happened just before Christmas break. Coincidence? I’m concerned that it might not be.

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    • November 16, 2011 at 8:22 pm
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      Woah! Woah! WOAH!

      Berg SHARED this story in Freshman Orientation! WHAT!?!

      I know the girl who did that. I know the whole story. Berg didn’t have to “deck the guy” for her, she slapped the tar out of her date herself. Berg then counseled her about not loosing her cool like that again.

      He may have spoken with the male student, but Berg wasn’t near the hero that he appears to claim here.

      And the situation certainly wasn’t funny. The date did much more than try to put his hand on her knee, he tried to cop a feel much further north than the girls knee!!!

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      • November 17, 2011 at 1:20 pm
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        First, if I’m putting this together right, this story has been shared in Freshman Orientation for quite some time, since “David” says below that he heard it in 2007, and I heard it about a decade before that.

        Second, changing the details of the story to omit the girl’s (justifiable) response and put himself in the role of protector is another someone-subtle attack on the victim.

        Third, wouldn’t her actual response to what her date did be what the powers-that-be are looking for–since there seems to be an implication of potential complicity in their minds if the victim freezes up (a completely normal response). What would they have a victim do? Where is the perfect balance response in these situations? It just seems like they *always* want to blame the victim.

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        • November 17, 2011 at 1:26 pm
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          No it ISN’T He shared enough of the detail that I Know EXACTLY who it is. Not naming the person wasn’t good enough. This is the ULTIMATE in breaking confidentiality and a number of other things. Berg is known soooo well at doing this.

          He could be sued for this!

          Don’t worry “the girl” now knows, and she says she is writing a letter to Berg. No worries.

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        • November 17, 2011 at 2:07 pm
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          And a decade before that? That makes it even worse for Berg. Looks like the “girl” now woman, has quite a number of years of Freshman ORI names for legal depositions as witness for the plaintiff if she decided to sue. He didn’t change his “story” to make it so it was unrecognizable who he was talking about. Furthermore, Berg said he had been counseling the “girl” and she had a setback. Oh yeah, Berg has been sued before, he may find himself there again.

          Nice one Bergy!

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          • November 17, 2011 at 2:31 pm
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            I meant somewhat-subtle, not someone-subtle. Not really proofreading today.

            And I’m glad she knows. I’m sorry she didn’t know sooner, and I’m sorry her story was shared without her permission-and that her story was told in such a way as to minimize her experience.

          • November 18, 2011 at 6:52 pm
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            i remember this exact story too…

        • November 30, 2011 at 9:16 pm
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          I heard it when i was there. 1999-2002

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        • January 10, 2013 at 7:54 pm
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          I remember that story, too, and my orientations (1995-’96) predate the renovation of the Concert Center to Stratton Hall. He’s been using that one for a long time. Camille, I’m so brokenhearted for your roommate, and incensed at how these things were handled. What kills me is how naive I was (among so many) to believe that these crimes were handled properly.

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      • November 20, 2011 at 1:57 pm
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        Male authority figures who have a need to ’embellish’ stories like that, how pathetic. And ‘he’ brags publically how mad he was, and then ‘told her off’ privately for ‘losing her cool’? Give me a break! So ‘it’s okay’ for a man to be angry, as angry as he wants to be, ‘but it’s not okay’ for a woman to be angry, about anything? What a double standard! Two kinds of rules for religious fools. One for the men and another for the hen. Maybe the hens need to have a hen gathering, and kick the rooster out!

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    • January 28, 2013 at 1:25 am
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      TimF, I remember hearing this exact same story in Freshman Orientation in 1996. As I read the article I immediately thought of that as well, every detail made a huge impression at the time. I can still hear him retelling the story… and to think that one of my degrees from there was in “Biblical Counseling.” This is simply heartbreaking.

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    • March 21, 2014 at 1:32 pm
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      I remember Berg telling that story to.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 4:37 pm
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    Question 1: This report says Criminal Offenses-on campus: Does this mean sexual assault/rape that happened on campus? or reported to someone on campus? Maybe both? Question 2: Has BJ EVER reported an assault/rape on campus over the years?

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  • November 16, 2011 at 4:37 pm
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    Thank you so much for being willing to share this hard story. I actually have the exact same screen cap in my pictures. Zero??? REALLY? I KNOW, I KNOW that zero is a lie. There is no conceivable justification for operating above the law in these matters. This does not in someway violate our relationship with God to obey secular law in this matter. Refusing to cooperate with (or simply notify) law enforcement regarding the endangerment and alleged abuse of a child is illegal (and if we bring God, into the picture– IMMORAL). Infuriating.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 4:58 pm
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    I must admit that I’m worried the Powers that Be will look up “Jennifer” and threaten her.

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    • November 20, 2011 at 2:00 pm
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      IF “jennifer’ is aready on line’ on a blog, as anonymous, I hope the moderator can help her change her anonymous name or whatever, to protect her. This could be really scary for her.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 5:27 pm
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    A friend of mine from BJ told me that a new rule was created because of a father molesting his daughter. The father would visit the daughter at school and she would stay with him at a hotel. At the hotel he would abuse her. She told this to someone at BJ. Now there is a rule that no one can sleep in a hotel room with their opposite-sex parent. I was shocked by this, and that my friend actually thought this was a great new rule. I said this is a case for the police. My friend said, well, that girl would never report her father to the police. This was some 10 years ago.

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    • November 17, 2011 at 12:31 pm
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      1.) That is disgusting that they made this rule. Absolutely disgusting. Not every adult male is a pervert.

      2.) Berg has told men not to sit on their daughter’s beds to avoid the appearance of evil.

      If THAT is where his mind automatically goes, I really fear for that man. Sad. Sad. Sad.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 5:32 pm
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    edit to my comment: My friend said, “well, that girl would never report her father to the police.”

    I had this conversation some 10 years ago.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 5:43 pm
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    So is the way the law works says that even if it didn’t happen at BJU, Berg would still have to report it? Secondly, were all of these laws and regulations in place when these incidents happened? Just clarifying this all for my benefit.

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    • November 16, 2011 at 6:01 pm
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      Yes. A minor was at risk. He was a mandatory reporter by state law.

      Reply
  • November 16, 2011 at 6:09 pm
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    In my years at BJU I heard that very same speach by Berg, and wonderd at the time why he never went to the police. It makes you wonder, how many other times this happend in his years there, and how many hundreds of children where alowed to be molested because these criminals didn’t end up in jail where they belonged?

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  • November 16, 2011 at 6:35 pm
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    Phenomenal post, Camille. There is also a new scandal brewing at the Citadel!

    This Penn State thing will flush a lot of this stuff out of the woodwork.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 7:17 pm
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    Ok about the story “timf” told above:

    I can add my voice to those vouching that this story is true. I was there that year in freshman orientation as well (in Stratton Hall, ’07 was the year I heard it). I remember it seemed rather odd to me — it sounded like Dr. Berg had given the girl some good advice, but in working her through it, Dr. Berg never mentioned reporting the crime or working to see justice done. I would agree that *ideally*, reconciliation would take place and include forgiveness, but above all else isn’t *justice* to be done first and foremost?

    I’m not trying to make excuses, just trying to be thorough: if the girl was no longer a minor and didn’t *want* to report or press charges, would Dr. Berg still have been legally required to report it? Can anyone provide a link to the actual law for a case like that?

    I’m not angry or embittered against BJU. I’m no longer a fundamentalist, but I don’t expect them to became an evangelical like me. But I *am* on the side of truth and justice, and so stories like this concern me. A lot.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 7:41 pm
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    I’m going to b=play devil’s advocate, because if it is true they are blatantly and repeatedly breaking the law and lying about it, then I say we report them and they get themselves kicked to the south pole. Is the following how they got away with not reporting it? “Professional mental health and religious counselors are exempt from reporting obligations, but may refer patients to a confidential reporting system which the school has to indicate whether or not it has.”

    From: (http://www.securityoncampus.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=297%3Aclerysummary&catid=64%3Acleryact&Itemid=60)

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    • November 16, 2011 at 8:03 pm
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      No doubt this would fall under the category of “school personnel” rather than “religious counselor,” which typically would refer (if I’m not mistaken) to clergy in a confessional-type situation. School personnel are always required to report, although as I said above, I’d be interested (continuing the devil’s-advocate method) to hear if reporting was mandatory if the victim was no longer a minor and didn’t want to report or press charges. Anyone?

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    • March 11, 2012 at 7:38 pm
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      They DO break the law, but I don’t think they even pretend that they make the reports as mandated. I think they just somehow believe the law just doesn’t apply to them. As far as I understand, they will admit to not reporting even when minors are involved. They just don’t see it as their “responsibility” to intervene.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 7:51 pm
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    I’m at Duke and somewhat (very somewhat) familiar with the Clery Act — we routinely receive Blackberry Alerts when a violent crime occurs on campus. Double check me here, but Clery requires an institution be report crime occuring directly on campus, immediately adjacent to campus, or at off-site properties owned, or under the control of the institution, where students are present and exposed. Clery Act is basically a “Consummer Protection Act”, of sorts, to ensure full disclosure for the consumming public, i.e., parents and students who pay tuition.

    I don’t think the Charles Snow arrest would fall under Clery, since the crime reportedly occurred away from BJU campus (out of state?). Interestingly, the WYFF4 link you provide states that BJU reported the student to G’ville County authorities – a morally responsible action – but not a Clery prompt, as I read the Act. I think in most states and in SC, “Failure to Report” suspected or known abuse of a minor is only a misdemeanor class offenss — though this will likely change with fallout from Penn State…

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    • November 16, 2011 at 8:50 pm
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      And it was an employee of BJU. Who works with minors. It needs to be reported for Clery. Period.

      Go back 10 years — they’ve reported NO crimes under Clery other than burglaries. NONE. :/ We all can remember (alleged) crimes that far back. Chad Gleiser anyone?

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      • November 16, 2011 at 10:30 pm
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        I’m not seeing the requirement applying to employees of the institution (although it certainly ought to!!!). Ergo, it would seem to be a bit of a loophole: if an employee commits the crime off campus, it doesn’t have to be reported. Can you provide a link showing that employee’s actions also have to be disclosed?

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    • November 16, 2011 at 9:42 pm
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      (Private Message) Camille… I’m not familiar to you, I know, but for months I’ve enjoyed reading your blog and following the conversations on the “Truth Seeking” FB page.

      I graduated from BJA in ’79 as a dorm student (the personal “project” of your Mark Minnick who brought me down from the little North Carolina church he pastored as a grad assistant). I was a BJU Preacher Boy and worked at the [sexy] Information Desk until ’82, when I had my own crisis of confidence in fundamentalist moorings and left BJU and “fundamentalism”.

      To be honest, sometimes following your BJU storyline feels like watching a prolonged train wreck — hating to see anyone get hurt but powerless to stop looking. I hope you’ll extend the hand… I’m paper trained, don’t bark, and rarely ever bite, much. Tp

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      • November 20, 2011 at 2:12 pm
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        When people stop empowering the train, only then will it ‘stop rolling’and ‘ruining people’s lives’. We inadvertanly keep ’empowering’ bad people, bad leaders,bad institutions, when we ‘keep following them.’ How to stop empowering bad people, bad leaders? STOP FOLLOWING THEM. And expose them for the wrong they have done and are still doing. And stop making excuses for them. We all need to be willing to be a part of the solution, and not allow ourselves, in any way, to continue to be a part of the problem. As long as we choose to walk in the light and in the truth about all this, I believe we are being a part of the solution. But we will have stones thrown at us. Because people like these who need to be exposed, they don’t like the truth, they hate the truth, they will do whatever they can to silence the telling of the truth. But we are not afraid of the truth, because we have nothing to hide. So when the stones and spears come flying at us, have no fear, God is near!

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      • January 25, 2012 at 11:49 am
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        Hey Tim,
        I know this is a late response to your post. I just couldn’t resist saying something. “I’m paper trained, don’t bark, and rarely ever bite, much”! Delightful sense of humor. You know, Tim, your post reminds me of something very special about folks like us, who are the fortunate escapees from ‘spiritual abuse’ and ‘fundamentalism'( I was never a fundamentalist but i was really badly burned and abused in spiritually abusive environments ) .. that God’s Healing Spirit, always available to us, : his merciful-loving-healing-kindness, includes this wonderful gift, this charism, in the beautiful heaven sent package of His sweet Grace: A SENSE OF HUMOR. When we first get out of the ( negative group ) God empowers us to begin to ‘get the group out of us.’ Then we learn to love ourselves with His love, journey through the honest process of forgiveness and get our self-respect back. Then as He releases us from all that negativity, as we honestly work through our true feelings and emotions, especially anger… we ‘GET OUR SENSE OF HUMOR BACK.’ I so appreciate God for being WHO He really is, that, in time, God even restores our ability to TRUST, and He teaches us with his wisdom, to learn to trust people who ‘really’ honor and respect us. But you know, Tim, the charism of ‘a sense of humor’ is such a good sign of real healthiness inside the person’s life. I am so glad you escaped from fundamentalism, and are enjoying real life on the outside where the sun shines so bright, and the air is so fresh and clear. God Bless you.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 7:59 pm
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    @David: I was there too (Freshman Orientation, Stratton Hall, 2007). I remember Berg seeming to be protective and kind towards the girl when he recounted what happened, but you’re right, I don’t recall him ever mentioning turning the abuser into the police.

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    • November 18, 2011 at 3:32 pm
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      Guys, this wasn’t a story just told once one year. I was a freshman in 2003 and heard the story then. I’ve always wondered about the complete breach of confidentiality that these guys, preachers, counselors, evangelists, get away with under the guise of sermon illustrations.

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  • November 16, 2011 at 8:07 pm
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    I would say the Berg is was an administrator of Bob Jones University not just a religious counselor. That can easily be proven. That would put Berg, Dean of Women/Dean of Men, Dorm Counselors and Dormitory Supervisors in the same category.

    Liberty University got itself in trouble with Clery Law enforcement due to a similar over-site.

    Aside from Clery law, is SC Law. SC has NEVER recognized Clergy or religious counselors exempt from reporting.

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    • November 29, 2011 at 2:58 pm
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      Is anyone familiar with BJU’s InfoMan report keeping system. I was having female health issues while at BJU and was refused treatment repeatedly by their clinic. Since I was not married, they refused to send me to a specialist/gynecologist. After one really bad episode, when I came back to work my boss already knew about it b/c he read about it on InfoMan. When I questioned why my personal health information was being shared on the system I was given so lame excuse that Dr. Berg was allowed because he was categorized as a health professional. I left BJU disgusted after many years, but first went to the admin building to discuss my treatment with the head of the clinic. The secretary was nice, but the heads didn’t want to hear anything. They told me they have the best health system and if I was discontented, I could leave. I was cut off by a pious prayer and was dismissed from the office. Since I have left, I have found several other woman that were treated the same way. We obeyed all the rules and lived the perfect BJU life, yet were treated with no value whatsoever.

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      • November 29, 2011 at 4:06 pm
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        Oh my! That’s awful. No, he’s not any sort of health care professional. Has no license. His only earned degrees are from BJU and are unaccredited. Oh my! I’m so, so sorry. How does this continue? HOW?? HOW?? I don’t understand.

        BJU continues to deny the existence of InfoMan. I don’t understand why exactly. I’ve seen the codes. I have the screen shots. I have a “U” by my name, last I heard. Stands for “unfriendly.” If you have been expelled, you have a “WP” which stands for “withdrew under pressure.” There’s also “F” which means that they are “friendly” even if you think otherwise.

        I’m so sorry. This needs to stop. It just needs to stop.

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        • December 14, 2011 at 8:48 pm
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          Bob Jones continues because God is the ultimate judge and sustainer. If God wasn’t guiding this institution, it would not be where it is today. I was born, grew up, and was educated at BJES, BJJH, BJA, and BJU. I have since received a Master’s and Doctorate from secular universities. I do not attend a fundamental church and my professional life as an educator has been in the public sector. What I do know is that the blogs I have read are saturated with cynicism and bitterness. Deny it all you want…this website has no validity and isn’t taken serious by anyone of importance. These blogs will have no affect on BJU. Misery loves company and that is all that is going on here.

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        • March 11, 2012 at 7:46 pm
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          Wow! I never heard of InfoMan. Is there any way to find out what is next to our names?

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          • March 11, 2012 at 8:40 pm
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            When alumni have asked in the recent past, they are rebuffed.

            But you can always try! Federal law says they are supposed to give it to you.

      • November 29, 2011 at 4:19 pm
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        Uhhh… best health care system!? No way. I was given improper care at BJU for a foot problem, and I suffered for 24 years as a result. Proper care and therapy to prevent future flare-ups would have saved me years of trouble. Knowing they would violate privacy on top of improper care, and even refuse to allow an unmarried woman to see a proper gyno, that’s all just over-the-top. Where is the oversight for their medical stuff? Oh yeah, probably nonexistent.

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      • November 29, 2011 at 11:43 pm
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        What you describe is a clear violation of HIPAA. Each occurrence is up to a $50,000 and a $1.5 million cap per year for similar violations. This kind of stuff needs to stop and the only way this will is for them to get cited. Please file a grievance with the Feds.

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  • November 17, 2011 at 12:44 am
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    THIS one:

    http://www.wyff4.com/news/25017037/detail.html

    They didn’t need to report to Clery because she was 1.6 miles from campus. Yes, she was a student. Yes, she was late to check in. But otherwise, no.

    But an employee? Whose “friendliness” with with underage Academy girls had been observed and reported on campus? And then THIS?

    Come on, you all.

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  • November 17, 2011 at 1:01 am
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    What the Chipper Snow incident proves is that these things are recent. We can’t dismiss this as something that happened a long time ago.

    What my observation and the observations of many other students in this discussion prove is that this is BJU policy. It is policy to not report to the police what they should have. And, it seems plain to me, they have not reported to the Feds what they should have either.

    For those that are still unsure, add this one to the mix:

    http://chucklestravels.wordpress.com/2011/09/28/bju-backs-down-sort-of/

    They just “corrected” their stated policy on reporting. Just did. Third acts like it’s never, ever been a problem. We know it was a problem on September 27, 2011. Such a problem that they did a quick cut-and-paste to fix the officially stated policy.

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  • November 17, 2011 at 7:07 am
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    http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2099381,00.html

    “If these allegations of sexual abuse [At Penn State] are true, then this is a horrible tragedy for those young boys,” Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a statement announcing the department’s investigation into Penn State. “If it turns out that some people at the school knew of the abuse and did nothing or covered it up, that makes it even worse. Schools and school officials have a legal and moral responsibility to protect children and young people from violence and abuse.”

    But despite having such responsibility, disclosing campus crime has often been a process fraught with confusion, loopholes, inaction, inconsistencies and, in some cases, negligence and cover-ups. To date, seven colleges and universities have paid Clery Act fines for failure to comply with the law; sometimes the violation stemmed from not having the appropriate institutional structures in place, sometimes from failing to disclose information. The most egregious case to date took place at Eastern Michigan University in 2006 when administrators were found to have covered up the rape and murder of a student, letting her parents think she had died of natural causes. The university was fined $350,000, the largest fine ever paid under the Clery Act. (A lawsuit forced Eastern Michigan to pay the victim’s family an additional $2.5 million.)

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  • November 17, 2011 at 8:53 am
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    Camille,

    Three questions:

    What were the mandatory reporting laws in 1989?

    Did you report it to the police?

    Were you also considered a mandatory reporter since you were in a position of authority

    Interestingly, his advice about not telling a boyfriend is actually good advice (perhaps one of the few instances). It is well established that people who have been sexually abused are often easy pickings for predatory types. And often, they figure, I am already ruined, so I deserve it. Or they figure this is a way that I can get attention. This is not particularly strange. I am surprised you are not familiar with it. Perhaps you are and just didn’t say it here.

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    • November 17, 2011 at 9:06 am
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      1) The same
      2) No. Berg said not to. Remember?
      3) No. I was a student. Remember? I was not in a professional capacity.
      4) I did say. Remember?

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      • November 17, 2011 at 11:03 am
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        Wow … that seemed a little snippy. But maybe it’s just early.

        1. I don’t know the legislative history and SC doesn’t give it on the website. So I asked. Do you actually know the legislative history? Can you point me to it online?

        2. I don’t remember reading that Berg told you not to report. Your article said he told her not to report (14th paragraph after the picture). Have you reported it now, at least to this guy’s church so they can get him out of his position? Or are you still covering it up? What is the statute of limitations in this girl’s state?

        3. Prayer captains are a position of authority and I didn’t know whether they were legally responsible to report or not. Thanks for clarifying. Certainly I would think they are morally responsible to report. But I know college students don’t always have fully developed moral faculties yet. I know I didn’t.

        4. I don’t see any place where you say whether you were familiar with the psychology involved in being a rape victim of not. Your paragraph beginning with “But other things were just … strange,” reads a lot like you are not familiar with the psychology of it. You sound like you were doubting whether or not Berg’s advice was good. You seem to think he was laying blame on her by this, and you said you didn’t know whether it helped or hurt, but it seemed harder to live in darkness than light. Perhaps you just forgot what you said, or didn’t say what you were thinking. But you didn’t seem convinced that “Don’t tell a boyfriend” was good advice.

        I am not blaming you for anything, although it seems you sinned against this girl by failing to report. I understand Berg wields a pretty big shadow and is intimidating to some. But given the hostile stance you have taken towards others for their failures to report in past years, perhaps a confession is in order for your sin in failing to report and protect this girl and other people from this man.

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        • November 17, 2011 at 12:59 pm
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          Okay, I don’t normally jump in like this, but I have to this time.

          2 and 3. If the victim was told not to report, (with the message being that she didn’t want to break up her family), and Berg wasn’t going to report, the strong, unspoken implication is that *no one* else should report. While a mandatory reporter should be taken seriously by law enforcement and has a legal responsibility to report, there is the principle, when you’re a peer (which, basically, an APC or PC is at BJU–they’re more in leadership in name than in any actual power) that you’re there in a supportive capacity for the victim; you’re there to encourage him or her to report, to go with him or her to report, to understand if they’re unable to report at this moment; part of supporting victims is empowering them to make their own choices. Today, the most empowering–and strongest legal–option for the victim would be for her to go to the police. Victims need to have certain people who are “safe” people–people they can go to just for listening and encouragement, people who empower them to do what they need to do. People who help them regain the perceived personhood that an abuser stole.

          4. Berg did much more than tell her not to tell a boyfriend–advice which I, too, agree with and think is healthy. But he also said two other things: he (Berg) would tell the boyfriend/fiance/husband if “Jennifer” wanted him to, and that “there was no reason she ever needed to tell her boyfriend/fiancé/husband about the events unless she needed to keep her own children away from their grandpa’s care.” Issue with the first pice of advice: again, it takes the power away from someone who’s already been victimized. Choosing when, where, and how you choose to tell your own story can be a major part of the healing process, of regaining your voice when you’ve been victimized. A huge part of victimization is the silence surrounding it. When you regain the ability to tell the true story of what happened to you, you are well on the road to recovery. Second issue is twofold: the idea that her *husband* need never know, and the implication that she *may not* need to protect her own children from their grandfather’s care. How can you have an open, supportive, *healthy* husband and wife relationship if you don’t/can’t trust your spouse enough to reveal something this important in your past? Speaking from very different, but no less real, personal experience, I can say that I did not share my past with just any guy I dated, but, once I was on the way to marrying my husband, not only did I share with him, but he was and has been a very real part of my own journey to recovery. A husband is commanded to love his wife as his own body, to protect her, to care for her, to “dwell with her in an understanding way.” How can he do those things if he doesn’t even know her greatest hurts? And I shouldn’t need to add the potential damage that keeping a secret like this unspoken in a marriage relationship can have in so many, many ways. As far as whether her children may need to be kept from her father’s care, that should also be obvious. And “Jennifer’s” husband would probably need to know the reasoning behind keeping them away from someone who, in a normal, healthy family, should be a natural go-to person for their children.

          What Camille is doing here is the absolute opposite of covering up. She’s fighting for the protection of those who aren’t strong enough to protect themselves, and she’s trying to empower them to tell their own stories while pointing out how a system that was supposed to protect legally, morally, and spiritually, did not and does not.

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          • November 17, 2011 at 1:02 pm
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            Please excuse the typos.

          • November 17, 2011 at 2:24 pm
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            Thanks for jumping in SB. I had a roommate and a friend at BJ who both sought protection from abuse and were not given support from the “counseling” staff. It is a hard position to be in, Camille, so I understand. I also remember a similar story being told in a counseling class.

            Does no one see the extreme and downright creepy position of authority that Berg is placing himself in by saying “I will tell your significant other”??? SERIOUSLY???

          • November 18, 2011 at 11:35 pm
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            S.B., I couldn’t have said it better. You jumped in with such well thought through words.Thank you for putting so much clarity in your post. I like what you said about ’empowering’. I had not thought of ‘that aspect of’ someone advising a victim to ‘not’ tell a ‘signifigent other’ in future marriage relationship. And how that was the opposite of empowering. Such an important point. I believe that ‘any’ kind of wrong doing, from A to Z, needs to be discussed by the victim as well as by bystanders of ‘knowing’ what happened to victims. I know first hand how much ‘I’ was traumatized, by being an underage child, younger sibling and helpless bystander,at the time of an older sibling being continually bullied by the angry father. I felt so powerless to help or protect him, and I had no one’ to talk to about it.It had a lasting unfortunate effect on me. Because the silent rule of toxic families, always being, ‘don’t ever tell anyone’ because, ‘what would the neighbors think?’ Has that not been ‘the silent rule of toxic instititutions’ as well? Such as BJU? Obviously sexual abuse is worse than bullying, and the latter unfortunately ‘can’t even be charged’ as a crime, yet, I don’t believe. Sure hope ‘that’ changes soon. But, subtle bullying of intimidation to ‘silence’, does that not enter into the picture, when authorities ‘don’t’ want to report, those who ‘know’ something, need to be intimidated to ‘not talk about it?’ And subtly suggested that ‘they would be wise to keep quiet about it ?’ I agree with how encouraging people to tell their stories, empowers them. That’s such a good point. Thanks so much for your post. It really helped me in my own thinking. With my own past as a child, I had no one to empower me. Now as an adult, I want God to grace me with his Grace to help empower people as well as I can. Am in the process of doing that very thing right now. And a victim of dreadful spiritual abuse is presently writing her story down in detail, for the head man in the parish to read. Something like a confidential victim statement. She and I ‘both’ want to protect people at our parish, in the future, from the person who so spiritually abused her when on prayer team.And we are doing this to responsibly request the pastor, ensure that this abusive person ‘never’ be on prayer team in our parish again! What happened to this victim sounds like a horror story nightmare that you’re ‘relieved’ to wake up from to know it was only a bad dream. But in this case, it wasn’t a bad dream. To not expose something as bad as what happened to her, would be unconscionable irresponsible, and a denial of truth, justice and reality. We’ve all got to get past this weak human tendency, of being afraid of the truth, of the bad side of reality, that exists when bad people do bad things, and someone must do something good about it to protect people. If bad people don’t want the truth, don’t like the truth, hate the truth, we’ve got to get past the fact that that is no reason for any of us, to use that as an excuse to do and say nothing. Because such people ‘won’t like that.’ Who we really care for, needs to be the victim first, and second the abuser, who needs to be stopped and prosecuted, and if possible prevented from doing such evil to another person again. Remaining silent, saying nothing, doing nothing, neglecting to help people, that is the completely wrong way to go. Thanks so much for your well thought through words of wisdom. I feel all the wiser for having read them.

        • November 17, 2011 at 2:05 pm
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          Thanks for all the judgment. What would I do without you, “lt”?

          And s/he says *I* am snippy.

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        • November 18, 2011 at 7:42 pm
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          Dear IT,I really am surprised by the ‘false-guilt’ suggestive innuendos, that you have so thoughtlessly ‘spinkled’ throughout your 2- 4 pointed questions to Camille. And how you have carefully done so on the pretense of attemtoing to ask obejective questions. and how your questions are arefully disguided, ‘mean spirited darts’!First of of all Camille shared on this post, how she wishes she had done more at the time, and honestly explained the circumstances as to ‘why’ she didn’t. Whenever an honest christian such as Camille, bares a part of her soul like that, there’s always some ‘shame-blame-false guilt sniper’religious ill pill, out there, all too ready willing and eager, to use a person’s honest words and regrets, and use them’against them.’ It is a most despicable form of condescension. Here you have arrogantly taken ‘the honest words’, and deliberately ‘turned them against her. Saying things like this” “Or are you still covering it up?” That’s MEAN! You know darn well,she did all she could do at the time, fully knowing ‘who’ had the authority to take the serious matter to another or a higher level. She responsibly exercised her responsibility as a prayer captain, who as an undergraduate, had no more authority than what the rules and protocol of BJU would allow such a student. She was’nt on the faculty. She was a student. And there’s a big, big diference in the social / spiritual / cultural ‘ multi -teared class system, strata of a peculiar sub culture environment like BJU. The person who had ALL the authority and ALL the power,to do anything about this matter,once Camille had brought it to his attention, was the authority figure Camille went to with this student. I don’t know if you realize, just how manipulative your words are throughout your points 2-4! How negatively you are attempting to manipulate false blame and false guilt onto Camille. If anything was left undone, it was left undone by the authority figure she went to with that student, however intentionally or unintentionally he did so . Only God knows what went through the mind of that authority figure at the time. You are trying to place false blame and false guilt on someone ‘now’ who was ‘not’ at all in authority at the time of this incident. There is a big, big difference between an administrator’s authority, and a student prayer captain’s responsibility.
          “Or are you still trying to cover it up?” IT, this entire post is about exposing what ‘was’ covered up by one of the bosses! Duhhhh! How could Camille be covering ‘anything’ up, when she’s exposing this RIGHT NOW in clear English? Get a life man, and think before you make such ridicuous statements. 3. I already responded to 3. Prayer captains have a responsibility. Administration people have the authority AND the responsibility to ‘escalate’ to a higher level, ie ‘the authorities outside of and beyond the Institution’s jurisdiction. 4. How could some one at the age of being a student, be familiar with anything to do with the psychology of victimization? A really stupid question! Especially since, at the time, BJU was so against anything that smacked of extra-biblical realities or truths about human suffering,and people’s need for genuine healing, and was probably just about as blind in their ignorance and stupidity back ‘then’ as they are right ‘now’,about the healing sciences. So much of fundamentalism calls psychology ‘psycho babble’. Which really says, ‘how little they care ‘ about human suffering, especially the very suffering they themselves cause people, with their loveless, cheerless, graceless poor excuse for religion. Now did BJU offer course on psycho babble back then when Camille was a student? I doubt it! “I am not blaming you for anything”….are you kidding IT??? In the same sentence you completely contradict yourself, by saying “although it seems you sinned aginst this girl by failing to report!!” Now you’re playing the false judge from the fundy lore, with ‘look how bad you were, because you did’nt do more!’ The administration person was the one who ‘failed to report.’ IF Camille had ‘gone over his head’ she probably would have been expelled! “Perhaps a confession is in order for your sin in failing to report”…. wow, how low can you go IT? That’s really hitting beow the belt. Is someone over at BJU coaching you on how you write such religious dribble nonsense? How can you suggest any one else could have a hostile stance about ‘anything’, when you write such a negative post such as this so filled with blame -shifting innuendo,that it reeks with hostility. Your post is ‘so’ provocative. Talk about ‘passive-agressive!’ Do you enjoy riling people, IT? Because you’re sure an expert at it, IT! Before you piously and arrogantly suggest how others need to confess their sins, maybe you woud be better off taking a good, honest look in the mirror of the scriptures,you know that book that has something to do with TRUTH, and start confessing your own. Psalm 51 is a good place to start. Man oh man are you “a piece of work!”signed: “livid with your lip”!

          Reply
  • November 17, 2011 at 1:13 pm
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    Please do not read this in any way as an excuse for the bad behavior of either Snow or BJU…but the fact that this incident isn’t on the Clery report does not prove that they are liars (I am not defending their other, provably false statements.)

    The DOE Handbook says this: “Remember, location is the key here—statistics for Clery crimes that don’t occur within your Clery geography are not included in your Clery statistical disclosures even if your students or employees are involved.”

    The Snow incident is NOT a Clery-reportable offense if the police report is correct that this crime did not happen on campus or at another BJ-owned facility despite his employment status. I believe you weaken your case when you point to BJU not doing something they specifically are not required to do as prove of an intentional cover up.

    Reply
    • November 17, 2011 at 2:03 pm
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      does not prove that they are liars

      Never said that. I was very careful with my words.

      We all know he’s not telling the truth–either ignorantly or deliberately.

      He could have misspoken. He could be mistaken. He could be uninformed.

      Technically? This is not for us here to decide. This is for the legal system to parse out. Liberty U’s in trouble right now for this very thing — for underreporting. BJU has not reported anything to Clery for ten years except for burglaries. Nothing. Nothing. And this needs sunshine. That’s what I’m saying.

      Reply
  • November 18, 2011 at 11:23 am
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    Thank you, Camille, for saying the tough stuff that people need to hear, even when it’s not pretty. If BJU would just choose to stand WITH an apology for their wrongs then maybe their anti-testimony of ungrace would turn into a true testimony of God’s love. Then maybe I’d feel like I should hang my diplomas on the wall. http://frenchizal.blogspot.com/2011/11/apologies.html

    Reply
  • November 18, 2011 at 4:22 pm
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    According to the link to the news story, “Officials at BJU said they found out about the allegations and told the Sheriff’s Office.”

    Read more: http://www.wyff4.com/news/25003278/detail.html#ixzz1e5efq9a5

    The report above cites only ‘on campus’ incidents and the news report says it was a non-campus, incident.

    Reply
    • November 18, 2011 at 4:38 pm
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      Yes. That’s all been stated. It’s not reporting to the POLICE that’s the issue. It’s reporting to the FEDs. We don’t KNOW that it didn’t take place in the Bob Jones, Inc. property. We don’t know.

      Doesn’t it make parents of current or prospective students feel better to know that BJU would prefer to under-report to Clery?

      Reply
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  • November 21, 2011 at 4:03 pm
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    If I remember from the news articles about Chip Snow, the crime didn’t occur on campus. CLERY only requires reporting of crimes that occur on campus, if I’m not mistaken.

    Reply
  • November 24, 2011 at 12:48 pm
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    I could be wrong, but it was my understanding that BJU were the first reporters of the Snow incident, followed by the parents. The reporting requirement is about incidents on campus only- they have no requirement to report on that form the incidents happening off-campus, as the form applies to campus safety. They did, however report the incident to Greenville police (and were the first to do so), as I understand it.

    Reply
  • November 26, 2011 at 10:26 pm
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    So from a quick browse on Wikipedia.. it seems that “The Clery Act requires all colleges and universities that participate in federal financial aid programs to keep and disclose information about crime on and near their respective campuses.”

    Note that important phrase: “on and NEAR their respective campuses.”

    I don’t know the extent of what this means according to this law.. just pointing it out.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clery_Act

    Reply
  • November 27, 2011 at 8:08 pm
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    I would not say that I have enjoyed reading this blogg, but it has been enlightening. I grad from the Acad in 63 and then went one year to the univ. Back then, the only thing that I know happened was 2 girls in my prayer group were shipped for being sleeping together. Didn’t even know much about the homosexual lifestyle then. My one daughter grad in 96, and during the summer she took a counseling course from Dr Berg via video. I of course set and watched this with her, and was shocked at what I was hearing. Dr Berg was saying that the number of girls that came for counseling each year was almost overwhelming. Girls that were sexually abused by their fathers that were pastors, school principals, teachers and so forth. This just broke my heart. There was nothing mentioned about anyone calling the police on these men. If you can still find the video called crisis counseling, don’t take my word for this.

    Also, just a comment on Chuck Phelps being on the BJU board and the 3rd telling him to stay and not step down. I was wondering how Benneth feels about this? As most every one knows from her book, her father molester her all the time. Who protected her? It was not her mother! Her father would tell her this would not be happening to you if you were not so pretty. All this going on has to be bringing flahbacks. Doesn’t the 3rd have any compassion for his wife? Then again when I was there, there was not a lot of compassion for any one. I am a IFB, but am becoming very discusted even being one anymore!!!

    Reply
  • November 28, 2011 at 10:27 am
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    Hi Camille! I remember you from my BJ days when we were undergrads. I have been reading your blogs over the holiday weekend. You have given me some insight and validation. It has been a long process for me as I untangle the knotted tentacles of legalism in my life. I have some questions and was wondering if I can contact you via email? I don’t want to post for all to see-not as brave as you are! 🙂

    Reply
  • November 28, 2011 at 7:36 pm
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    It’s sorta interesting that the number of BJU’s burglary reports rival universities that are two or three times the size of BJU.

    Reply
    • November 28, 2011 at 11:12 pm
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      I bet if they put locks on the doors, the burglary reports would go way down.

      Reply
  • November 30, 2011 at 8:03 pm
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    “Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound.” Romans 5:20. Every institution has its nasty skeletons; heaven knows I have my own. I don’t know whether these accusation are true, but I do know there are good people from BJU and who work at BJU, who deplore this kind of behavior. They would never want to cover up any kind of criminal activity such as this. Why shouldn’t I choose to think of them in “grace” terms? What kind of sin of my own have I sought to cover up, even though God can see it? It’s easy to throw stones, but let’s remove the mote.

    Reply
  • December 5, 2011 at 3:38 pm
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    I have read this entire post and find much of it to be sad and some of it to be inaccurate. Sad because the abuse of a child, a young person or anyone for that matter should not be tolerated at any level. I am very familiar with SC DHEC regulations and the reporting requirements and assuming the majority of the comments made in this blog are correct several laws have been broken. Inaccurate because the Snow incident does not meet the definition of reporting requirements under the Clery Act. Jerk should have been fired, should have been arrested and should have been sent to prison – but legally it was not required to be reported. Having said that – I think BJU’s reporting under the Clery Act is incorrect. Read the Act, see what reporting is required. Look at G’ville County arrest reports – look at the map. Cross reference it with BJU’s Clery Report. A great deal is missing.

    Shame on BJU.

    One last comment. Many of you that posted on this blog made comments about abuses and crimes that you say you have person knowledge of – have you called the police and reported this? If you have, I admire and respect you. You have done the right thing to protect an abused person. If you have not – in my opinion you are not better than the people you complain about. Post your stories of how you intervened and saved someone from further abuse. In my opinion doing less is immoral.

    Reply
    • December 5, 2011 at 3:54 pm
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      Right! Unless you are perfect, shut up! That’s what Christianity is all about!

      Reply
  • December 5, 2011 at 7:56 pm
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    I added an update above, but I’ll include it here.

    The Chipper Snow crime occurred .7 miles driving distance from the BJU campus, so they must report it. Mind you, they must report it even if it did NOT include any employees or students. That’s the nature of the law.

    But again — .7 miles. Case closed.

    Reply
  • December 5, 2011 at 11:42 pm
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    Here is the relevant definition from the Department of Education regarding reporting locations for Clery:

    “All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.”

    Once you cross the sidewalk on the other side of Wade Hampton or the other streets (since the school has a boundary fence around the campus) you are by definition no longer in an “immediately adjacent” or “accessible” area.

    Here’s the statement defining adjacent and accessible off campus property from the DOE:

    “Your public property does not include anything beyond the second sidewalk. (If there isn’t a second sidewalk, it doesn’t include anything beyond the street.)”

    In addition if the crime occured in a private residence, then it is not reportable even if it happens in a home across the street from the school being rented by students. Again per the DOE:

    “Private homes and businesses are not included: Public property does not include any businesses or any private homes (i.e., businesses or homes not owned or controlled by your institution) even if they immediately border your campus. This means that your public property does not include Joe’s Coffee House even if it’s located right next to your campus and many of your students hang out there every day. Nor does it include a privately owned house next to your campus that some of your students rent.”

    I am not a BJU fan or defender. My father went there in the 1950s, and he didn’t want me to go near the place. When my children reached college age, it was even less of a consideration than that. I think putting Phelps on the board was at best folly, and the way they got him off the board was cowardly and resolved nothing.

    But your critique still needs to be accurate, and BJU isn’t failing to fulfill their Clery duty by not reporting something that by definition is not reportable. (I’m open to an argument that the Clery requirements should be changed, but we’re working with what they currently are.) The case isn’t closed by the failure to report the disgusting Snow incident. There may be–almost certainly are–Clery incidents that have not been included in prior year reports, but this simply isn’t one of them.

    Reply
    • December 5, 2011 at 11:59 pm
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      homes not owned or controlled by your institution

      This is where you are inaccurate. It was in university-owned housing.

      So in the interest of accuracy. . . .

      Reply
      • December 6, 2011 at 10:58 am
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        If it was in university owned housing, then the case is indeed closed. Fire away.

        Reply
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  • December 17, 2011 at 10:18 pm
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    Dr. Lewis-

    In my job, I am a mandated reporter. However, I have received training on the law regarding this. It sounds from what you said that you had been on faculty for some time before you were made aware of the laws regarding mandatory reporting. And it doesn’t appear that the training came as part of any official training from the school. Please understand that I don’t think this in any way exonerates him–but, I wonder if there’s a chance that Berg wasn’t aware of the mandatory reporting laws, or if he was aware, did not think that they applied to Bob Jones since they did not receive government funding, etc. As far as I know, he never worked anywhere but Bob Jones and didn’t get any kind of administrative training (or counseling training) other than on-the-job. I guess my point is, I wonder if it was willful disregard of the law or ignorance. In either case, the result is the same for the victim, but one speaks much worse of those in authority.

    On a completely different topic, I remember when Hepzibah house had a sponsorship spot on WMUU. (I think Ron Williams actually had a sermon or devotional spot.) I don’t know if it still comes on, but if it doesn’t, I wonder at what point it stopped and why

    Reply
    • December 18, 2011 at 1:18 pm
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      That he’s unlicensed lets him wiggle out of this. But ignorance of the law is no excuse. ::shrug:: That’s why BJU’s September scramble to right their illegal policy was so necessary.

      Reply
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